Jackie Witherspoon (left), the Boys & Girls Club resource development director, talks over plans for the July 19 lunch event with Food Matters co-owner Al

Jackie Witherspoon (left), the Boys & Girls Club resource development director, talks over plans for the July 19 lunch event with Food Matters co-owner Al Kirchner. One feature will be hamburgers made from locally raised beef.

Jackie Witherspoon (left), the Boys & Girls Club resource development director, talks over plans for the July 19 lunch event with Food Matters co-owner Al Kirchner. One feature will be hamburgers made from locally raised beef.

Kirchner. One feature will be hamburgers made from locally raised beef.

The Food Matters market located in Market Street Center by Straus Park will be offering an outdoor lunch treat from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 19 at which proceeds from sales will go entirely to the Cindy Platt Boys & Girls Club of Transylvania County.

The boutique market and cafe, which focuses on healthy foods, local products and community involvement, will donate the food and drinks to the Boys & Girls Club for this event.

“We’re community-driven,” said general manager Rebecca Frankwicz, “and this event is right in line with what we do.”

The menu will feature hot dogs, hamburgers made from locally raised beef, and a choice of potato chips or a healthy side dish from the market’s café. A barbecue grill, manned by Boys & Girls Club directors and staff members, will be set up in the market’s outdoor courtyard and garden area, which offers abundant seating.

The hot dog lunch will be $6, the hamburger, $8. Each will come with a bottle of water. Beer, to be donated by the local Oskar Blues Brewery, will be offered at $2. Co-owner Al Kirchner says Food Matters, which he and partner Mike Cianciarulo opened two years ago, has established a policy of aiding local non-profits with such events.

“We are very pleased to donate the food and drinks, along with the use of our facility for this event,” he said. “It’s well worth it to help a great organization such as the Boys & Girls Club.”

The club’s resource development director, Jackie Witherspoon, said such fundraising events that cost the club nothing to stage are particularly valuable.

“Whatever they make, it’s all for us,” she said. “It’s a big deal… it doesn’t happen often.”

The club’s children will bake cookies to give away as dessert, Witherspoon said. One of the features of the Boys & Girls Club building on Gallimore Road is its commercial-size kitchen, in which children learn nutrition and culinary skills.

The club will also provide music during the cookout, furnished by the students of its Junior Appalachian Musicians, a club program headed by musician Josh Carter to teach instrumental music.

The club has nearly 500 members enrolled in its after-school youth development programs. On average, 200 fill its 25,000-square-foot clubhouse each day. They are supervised by a staff of seven full-time and 20 part-time persons. During the summer it operates an all-day program.

One of the club’s goals is to keep membership affordable, so annual dues are just $50 for the after-school activities. Revenue from dues amounts to only 2 percent of the budget. Most of the money to support the club’s $588,000 operating budget comes from events such as the Food Matters lunch, grants and donations from organizations and individuals.

Transylvania Times

July 10, 2014 | Vol. 128 – No. 55